20.10.06

This is What I Did Today.

Our characters are a father who constantly defines units of measurement, but will only define the same unit once within any one unit defined and his child, Randy, who is working on some homework.

Homework Assignment

Randy: Father, I was wondering what a joule was.

Father (brightens): Of course! A joule is an international system of units of measurement unit of work or energy, equal to the work done by a force of one international system of units of measurement unit of force, equal to the force that would give the mass of the international system of units of measurement unit of mass, equivalent to the international standard kept at Sevres near Paris (approximately 2.205 units of weight in general use equal to 16 ounce series of weights based on a pound of 16 ounces or 7,000 smallest units of weight in the troy and avoirdupois systems, equal to 1/5760 of a pound troy and 1/7000 of a pound avoirdupois [approximately 0.0648 a metric unit of mass equal to one thousandth of a kilogram], widely used in English-speaking countries) an acceleration of one fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a one fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 centimeters or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) per a sixtieth of a period of time equal to sixty seconds or a sixtieth of a period of time equal to a twenty-fourth part of a day and night and divided into 60 minutes of time, which as the international system of units of measurement unit of time is defined in terms of the natural periodicity of the radiation of a cesium-133 atom (Symbol: ″) per a sixtieth of a period of time equal to sixty seconds or a sixtieth of a period of time equal to a twenty-fourth part of a day and night and divided into 60 minutes of time, which as the international system of units of measurement unit of time is defined in terms of the natural periodicity of the radiation of a cesium-133 atom (Symbol: ″) and is equivalent to 100,000 units of force that, acting on a mass of one metric unit of mass equal to a thousandth of a international system of units of measurement unit of mass, equivalent to the international standard kept at Sevres near Paris (approxiamately 2.205 units of weight in general use equal to 16 ounce series of weights based on a pound of 16 ounces or 7,000 smallest units of weight in the troy and avoirdupois systems, equal to 1/5760 of a pound troy and 1/7000 of a pound avoirdupois [approximately 0.0648 a metric unit of mass equal to one thousandth of a kilogram], widely used in English-speaking countries) increases its velocity by one metric unit of length, equal to one hundredth of a fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a one fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 centimeters or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) per a sixtieth of a period of time equal to sixty seconds or a sixtieth of a period of time equal to a twenty-fourth part of a day and night and divided into 60 minutes of time, which as the international system of units of measurement unit of time is defined in terms of the natural periodicity of the radiation of a cesium-133 atom (Symbol: ″) every a sixtieth of a period of time equal to sixty seconds or a sixtieth of a period of time equal to a twenty-fourth part of a day and night and divided into 60 minutes of time, which as the international system of units of measurement unit of time is defined in terms of the natural periodicity of the radiation of a cesium-133 atom (Symbol: ″) along the direction that it acts when its point of application moves one fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a one fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 centimeters or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) in the direction of action of the force, equivalent to one 3600th of a measure of electrical energy equivalent to a power consumption of one international system of units of measurement unit of power, equivalent to one international system of units of measurement unit of work or energy, equal to the work done by a force of one international system of units of measurement unit of force, equal to the force that would give the mass of the international system of units of measurement unit of mass, equivalent to the international standard kept at Sevres near Paris (approximately 2.205 units of weight in general use equal to 16 ounce series of weights based on a pound of 16 ounces or 7,000 smallest units of weight in the troy and avoirdupois systems, equal to 1/5760 of a pound troy and 1/7000 of a pound avoirdupois [approximately 0.0648 a metric unit of mass equal to one thousandth of a kilogram], widely used in English-speaking countries) an acceleration of one fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a one fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 centimeters or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) per a sixtieth of a period of time equal to sixty seconds or a sixtieth of a period of time equal to a twenty-fourth part of a day and night and divided into 60 minutes of time, which as the international system of units of measurement unit of time is defined in terms of the natural periodicity of the radiation of a cesium-133 atom (Symbol: ″) per a sixtieth of a period of time equal to sixty seconds or a sixtieth of a period of time equal to a twenty-fourth part of a day and night and divided into 60 minutes of time, which as the international system of units of measurement unit of time is defined in terms of the natural periodicity of the radiation of a cesium-133 atom (Symbol: ″) and is equivalent to 100,000 units of force that, acting on a mass of one metric unit of mass equal to a thousandth of a international system of units of measurement unit of mass, equivalent to the international standard kept at Sevres near Paris (approxiamately 2.205 units of weight in general use equal to 16 ounce series of weights based on a pound of 16 ounces or 7,000 smallest units of weight in the troy and avoirdupois systems, equal to 1/5760 of a pound troy and 1/7000 of a pound avoirdupois [approximately 0.0648 a metric unit of mass equal to one thousandth of a kilogram], widely used in English-speaking countries) increases its velocity by one metric unit of length, equal to one hundredth of a fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a one fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 centimeters or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) per a sixtieth of a period of time equal to sixty seconds or a sixtieth of a period of time equal to a twenty-fourth part of a day and night and divided into 60 minutes of time, which as the international system of units of measurement unit of time is defined in terms of the natural periodicity of the radiation of a cesium-133 atom (Symbol: ″) every a sixtieth of a period of time equal to sixty seconds or a sixtieth of a period of time equal to a twenty-fourth part of a day and night and divided into 60 minutes of time, which as the international system of units of measurement unit of time is defined in terms of the natural periodicity of the radiation of a cesium-133 atom (Symbol: ″) along the direction that it acts when its point of application moves one fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a one fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 centimeters or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) in the direction of action of the force, equivalent to one 3600th of a measure of electrical energy equivalent to a power consumption of one international system of units of measurement unit of power, equivalent to one joule per second, corresponding to the power in an electric circuit in which the potential difference is one international system of units of measurement unit of electromotive force, the difference of potential that would drive one international system of units of measurement base unit of electric current, precisely defined as that constant current which, if maintained in two straight parallel conductors of infinite length, of negligible circular cross-section, and placed 1 fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 centimers or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) apart in a vacuum, would produce between these conductors a force of 2 × 10 −7 international system of units of measurement unit of force, equal to the force that would give the mass of the international system of units of measurement unit of mass, equivalent to the international standard kept at Sevres near Paris (approximately 2.205 units of weight in general use equal to 16 ounce series of weights based on a pound of 16 ounces or 7,000 smallest units of weight in the troy and avoirdupois systems, equal to 1/5760 of a pound troy and 1/7000 of a pound avoirdupois [approximately 0.0648 a metric unit of mass equal to one thousandth of a kilogram], widely used in English-speaking countries) an acceleration of one fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a one fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 centimeters or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) per a sixtieth of a period of time equal to sixty seconds or a sixtieth of a period of time equal to a twenty-fourth part of a day and night and divided into 60 minutes of time, which as the international system of units of measurement unit of time is defined in terms of the natural periodicity of the radiation of a cesium-133 atom (Symbol: ″) per a sixtieth of a period of time equal to sixty seconds or a sixtieth of a period of time equal to a twenty-fourth part of a day and night and divided into 60 minutes of time, which as the international system of units of measurement unit of time is defined in terms of the natural periodicity of the radiation of a cesium-133 atom (Symbol: ″) and is equivalent to 100,000 units of force that, acting on a mass of one metric unit of mass equal to a thousandth of a international system of units of measurement unit of mass, equivalent to the international standard kept at Sevres near Paris (approxiamately 2.205 units of weight in general use equal to 16 ounce series of weights based on a pound of 16 ounces or 7,000 smallest units of weight in the troy and avoirdupois systems, equal to 1/5760 of a pound troy and 1/7000 of a pound avoirdupois [approximately 0.0648 a metric unit of mass equal to one thousandth of a kilogram], widely used in English-speaking countries) increases its velocity by one metric unit of length, equal to one hundredth of a fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a one fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 centimeters or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) per a sixtieth of a period of time equal to sixty seconds or a sixtieth of a period of time equal to a twenty-fourth part of a day and night and divided into 60 minutes of time, which as the international system of units of measurement unit of time is defined in terms of the natural periodicity of the radiation of a cesium-133 atom (Symbol: ″) every a sixtieth of a period of time equal to sixty seconds or a sixtieth of a period of time equal to a twenty-fourth part of a day and night and divided into 60 minutes of time, which as the international system of units of measurement unit of time is defined in terms of the natural periodicity of the radiation of a cesium-133 atom (Symbol: ″) along the direction that it acts per one fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a one fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 centimeters or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) of current against one international system of units of measurement unit of electrical resistance, expressing the resistance in a circuit transmitting a current of one international system of units of measurement base unit of electric current, precisely defined as that constant current which, if maintained in two straight parallel conductors of infinite length, of negligible circular cross-section, and placed 1 fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 centimers or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) apart in a vacuum, would produce between these conductors a force of 2 × 10 −7 international system of units of measurement unit of force, equal to the force that would give the mass of the international system of units of measurement unit of mass, equivalent to the international standard kept at Sevres near Paris (approximately 2.205 units of weight in general use equal to 16 ounce series of weights based on a pound of 16 ounces or 7,000 smallest units of weight in the troy and avoirdupois systems, equal to 1/5760 of a pound troy and 1/7000 of a pound avoirdupois [approximately 0.0648 a metric unit of mass equal to one thousandth of a kilogram], widely used in English-speaking countries) an acceleration of one fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a one fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 centimeters or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) per a sixtieth of a period of time equal to sixty seconds or a sixtieth of a period of time equal to a twenty-fourth part of a day and night and divided into 60 minutes of time, which as the international system of units of measurement unit of time is defined in terms of the natural periodicity of the radiation of a cesium-133 atom (Symbol: ″) per a sixtieth of a period of time equal to sixty seconds or a sixtieth of a period of time equal to a twenty-fourth part of a day and night and divided into 60 minutes of time, which as the international system of units of measurement unit of time is defined in terms of the natural periodicity of the radiation of a cesium-133 atom (Symbol: ″) and is equivalent to 100,000 units of force that, acting on a mass of one metric unit of mass equal to a thousandth of a international system of units of measurement unit of mass, equivalent to the international standard kept at Sevres near Paris (approxiamately 2.205 units of weight in general use equal to 16 ounce series of weights based on a pound of 16 ounces or 7,000 smallest units of weight in the troy and avoirdupois systems, equal to 1/5760 of a pound troy and 1/7000 of a pound avoirdupois [approximately 0.0648 a metric unit of mass equal to one thousandth of a kilogram], widely used in English-speaking countries) increases its velocity by one metric unit of length, equal to one hundredth of a fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a one fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 centimeters or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) per a sixtieth of a period of time equal to sixty seconds or a sixtieth of a period of time equal to a twenty-fourth part of a day and night and divided into 60 minutes of time, which as the international system of units of measurement unit of time is defined in terms of the natural periodicity of the radiation of a cesium-133 atom (Symbol: ″) every a sixtieth of a period of time equal to sixty seconds or a sixtieth of a period of time equal to a twenty-fourth part of a day and night and divided into 60 minutes of time, which as the international system of units of measurement unit of time is defined in terms of the natural periodicity of the radiation of a cesium-133 atom (Symbol: ″) along the direction that it acts per one fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a one fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 centimeters or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) when subjected to a potential difference of one volt (Symbol: Ω) resistance and the current one international system of units of measurement base unit of electric current, precisely defined as that constant current which, if maintained in two straight parallel conductors of infinite length, of negligible circular cross-section, and placed 1 fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 centimers or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) apart in a vacuum, would produce between these conductors a force of 2 × 10 −7 international system of units of measurement unit of force, equal to the force that would give the mass of the international system of units of measurement unit of mass, equivalent to the international standard kept at Sevres near Paris (approximately 2.205 units of weight in general use equal to 16 ounce series of weights based on a pound of 16 ounces or 7,000 smallest units of weight in the troy and avoirdupois systems, equal to 1/5760 of a pound troy and 1/7000 of a pound avoirdupois [approximately 0.0648 a metric unit of mass equal to one thousandth of a kilogram], widely used in English-speaking countries) an acceleration of one fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a one fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 centimeters or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) per a sixtieth of a period of time equal to sixty seconds or a sixtieth of a period of time equal to a twenty-fourth part of a day and night and divided into 60 minutes of time, which as the international system of units of measurement unit of time is defined in terms of the natural periodicity of the radiation of a cesium-133 atom (Symbol: ″) per a sixtieth of a period of time equal to sixty seconds or a sixtieth of a period of time equal to a twenty-fourth part of a day and night and divided into 60 minutes of time, which as the international system of units of measurement unit of time is defined in terms of the natural periodicity of the radiation of a cesium-133 atom (Symbol: ″) and is equivalent to 100,000 units of force that, acting on a mass of one metric unit of mass equal to a thousandth of a international system of units of measurement unit of mass, equivalent to the international standard kept at Sevres near Paris (approxiamately 2.205 units of weight in general use equal to 16 ounce series of weights based on a pound of 16 ounces or 7,000 smallest units of weight in the troy and avoirdupois systems, equal to 1/5760 of a pound troy and 1/7000 of a pound avoirdupois [approximately 0.0648 a metric unit of mass equal to one thousandth of a kilogram], widely used in English-speaking countries) increases its velocity by one metric unit of length, equal to one hundredth of a fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a one fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 centimeters or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) per a sixtieth of a period of time equal to sixty seconds or a sixtieth of a period of time equal to a twenty-fourth part of a day and night and divided into 60 minutes of time, which as the international system of units of measurement unit of time is defined in terms of the natural periodicity of the radiation of a cesium-133 atom (Symbol: ″) every a sixtieth of a period of time equal to sixty seconds or a sixtieth of a period of time equal to a twenty-fourth part of a day and night and divided into 60 minutes of time, which as the international system of units of measurement unit of time is defined in terms of the natural periodicity of the radiation of a cesium-133 atom (Symbol: ″) along the direction that it acts per one fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a one fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 centimeters or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) for one period of time equal to a twenty-fourth part of a day and night and divided into 60 period of time equal to sixty sixtieth of a period of time equal to sixty seconds or a sixtieth of a period of time equal to a twenty-fourth part of a day and night and divided into 60 minutes of time, which as the international system of units of measurement unit of time is defined in terms of the natural periodicity of the radiation of a cesium-133 atom (Symbol: ″) or a sixtieth of a period of time equal to a twenty-fourth part of a day and night and divided into 60 minutes of time per second, corresponding to the power in an electric circuit in which the potential difference is one international system of units of measurement unit of electromotive force, the difference of potential that would drive one international system of units of measurement base unit of electric current, precisely defined as that constant current which, if maintained in two straight parallel conductors of infinite length, of negligible circular cross-section, and placed 1 fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 centimers or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) apart in a vacuum, would produce between these conductors a force of 2 × 10 −7 international system of units of measurement unit of force, equal to the force that would give the mass of the international system of units of measurement unit of mass, equivalent to the international standard kept at Sevres near Paris (approximately 2.205 units of weight in general use equal to 16 ounce series of weights based on a pound of 16 ounces or 7,000 smallest units of weight in the troy and avoirdupois systems, equal to 1/5760 of a pound troy and 1/7000 of a pound avoirdupois [approximately 0.0648 a metric unit of mass equal to one thousandth of a kilogram], widely used in English-speaking countries) an acceleration of one fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a one fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 centimeters or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) per a sixtieth of a period of time equal to sixty seconds or a sixtieth of a period of time equal to a twenty-fourth part of a day and night and divided into 60 minutes of time, which as the international system of units of measurement unit of time is defined in terms of the natural periodicity of the radiation of a cesium-133 atom (Symbol: ″) per a sixtieth of a period of time equal to sixty seconds or a sixtieth of a period of time equal to a twenty-fourth part of a day and night and divided into 60 minutes of time, which as the international system of units of measurement unit of time is defined in terms of the natural periodicity of the radiation of a cesium-133 atom (Symbol: ″) and is equivalent to 100,000 units of force that, acting on a mass of one metric unit of mass equal to a thousandth of a international system of units of measurement unit of mass, equivalent to the international standard kept at Sevres near Paris (approxiamately 2.205 units of weight in general use equal to 16 ounce series of weights based on a pound of 16 ounces or 7,000 smallest units of weight in the troy and avoirdupois systems, equal to 1/5760 of a pound troy and 1/7000 of a pound avoirdupois [approximately 0.0648 a metric unit of mass equal to one thousandth of a kilogram], widely used in English-speaking countries) increases its velocity by one metric unit of length, equal to one hundredth of a fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a one fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 centimeters or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) per a sixtieth of a period of time equal to sixty seconds or a sixtieth of a period of time equal to a twenty-fourth part of a day and night and divided into 60 minutes of time, which as the international system of units of measurement unit of time is defined in terms of the natural periodicity of the radiation of a cesium-133 atom (Symbol: ″) every a sixtieth of a period of time equal to sixty seconds or a sixtieth of a period of time equal to a twenty-fourth part of a day and night and divided into 60 minutes of time, which as the international system of units of measurement unit of time is defined in terms of the natural periodicity of the radiation of a cesium-133 atom (Symbol: ″) along the direction that it acts per one fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a one fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 centimeters or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) of current against one international system of units of measurement unit of electrical resistance, expressing the resistance in a circuit transmitting a current of one international system of units of measurement base unit of electric current, precisely defined as that constant current which, if maintained in two straight parallel conductors of infinite length, of negligible circular cross-section, and placed 1 fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 centimers or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) apart in a vacuum, would produce between these conductors a force of 2 × 10 −7 international system of units of measurement unit of force, equal to the force that would give the mass of the international system of units of measurement unit of mass, equivalent to the international standard kept at Sevres near Paris (approximately 2.205 units of weight in general use equal to 16 ounce series of weights based on a pound of 16 ounces or 7,000 smallest units of weight in the troy and avoirdupois systems, equal to 1/5760 of a pound troy and 1/7000 of a pound avoirdupois [approximately 0.0648 a metric unit of mass equal to one thousandth of a kilogram], widely used in English-speaking countries) an acceleration of one fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a one fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 centimeters or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) per a sixtieth of a period of time equal to sixty seconds or a sixtieth of a period of time equal to a twenty-fourth part of a day and night and divided into 60 minutes of time, which as the international system of units of measurement unit of time is defined in terms of the natural periodicity of the radiation of a cesium-133 atom (Symbol: ″) per a sixtieth of a period of time equal to sixty seconds or a sixtieth of a period of time equal to a twenty-fourth part of a day and night and divided into 60 minutes of time, which as the international system of units of measurement unit of time is defined in terms of the natural periodicity of the radiation of a cesium-133 atom (Symbol: ″) and is equivalent to 100,000 units of force that, acting on a mass of one metric unit of mass equal to a thousandth of a international system of units of measurement unit of mass, equivalent to the international standard kept at Sevres near Paris (approxiamately 2.205 units of weight in general use equal to 16 ounce series of weights based on a pound of 16 ounces or 7,000 smallest units of weight in the troy and avoirdupois systems, equal to 1/5760 of a pound troy and 1/7000 of a pound avoirdupois [approximately 0.0648 a metric unit of mass equal to one thousandth of a kilogram], widely used in English-speaking countries) increases its velocity by one metric unit of length, equal to one hundredth of a fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a one fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 centimeters or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) per a sixtieth of a period of time equal to sixty seconds or a sixtieth of a period of time equal to a twenty-fourth part of a day and night and divided into 60 minutes of time, which as the international system of units of measurement unit of time is defined in terms of the natural periodicity of the radiation of a cesium-133 atom (Symbol: ″) every a sixtieth of a period of time equal to sixty seconds or a sixtieth of a period of time equal to a twenty-fourth part of a day and night and divided into 60 minutes of time, which as the international system of units of measurement unit of time is defined in terms of the natural periodicity of the radiation of a cesium-133 atom (Symbol: ″) along the direction that it acts per one fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a one fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 centimeters or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) when subjected to a potential difference of one volt (Symbol: Ω) resistance and the current one international system of units of measurement base unit of electric current, precisely defined as that constant current which, if maintained in two straight parallel conductors of infinite length, of negligible circular cross-section, and placed 1 fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 centimers or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) apart in a vacuum, would produce between these conductors a force of 2 × 10 −7 international system of units of measurement unit of force, equal to the force that would give the mass of the international system of units of measurement unit of mass, equivalent to the international standard kept at Sevres near Paris (approximately 2.205 units of weight in general use equal to 16 ounce series of weights based on a pound of 16 ounces or 7,000 smallest units of weight in the troy and avoirdupois systems, equal to 1/5760 of a pound troy and 1/7000 of a pound avoirdupois [approximately 0.0648 a metric unit of mass equal to one thousandth of a kilogram], widely used in English-speaking countries) an acceleration of one fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a one fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 centimeters or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) per a sixtieth of a period of time equal to sixty seconds or a sixtieth of a period of time equal to a twenty-fourth part of a day and night and divided into 60 minutes of time, which as the international system of units of measurement unit of time is defined in terms of the natural periodicity of the radiation of a cesium-133 atom (Symbol: ″) per a sixtieth of a period of time equal to sixty seconds or a sixtieth of a period of time equal to a twenty-fourth part of a day and night and divided into 60 minutes of time, which as the international system of units of measurement unit of time is defined in terms of the natural periodicity of the radiation of a cesium-133 atom (Symbol: ″) and is equivalent to 100,000 units of force that, acting on a mass of one metric unit of mass equal to a thousandth of a international system of units of measurement unit of mass, equivalent to the international standard kept at Sevres near Paris (approxiamately 2.205 units of weight in general use equal to 16 ounce series of weights based on a pound of 16 ounces or 7,000 smallest units of weight in the troy and avoirdupois systems, equal to 1/5760 of a pound troy and 1/7000 of a pound avoirdupois [approximately 0.0648 a metric unit of mass equal to one thousandth of a kilogram], widely used in English-speaking countries) increases its velocity by one metric unit of length, equal to one hundredth of a fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a one fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 centimeters or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) per a sixtieth of a period of time equal to sixty seconds or a sixtieth of a period of time equal to a twenty-fourth part of a day and night and divided into 60 minutes of time, which as the international system of units of measurement unit of time is defined in terms of the natural periodicity of the radiation of a cesium-133 atom (Symbol: ″) every a sixtieth of a period of time equal to sixty seconds or a sixtieth of a period of time equal to a twenty-fourth part of a day and night and divided into 60 minutes of time, which as the international system of units of measurement unit of time is defined in terms of the natural periodicity of the radiation of a cesium-133 atom (Symbol: ″) along the direction that it acts per one fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a one fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 centimeters or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) or approximately 39.37 units of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 metric units of length, equal to one hundredth of a meter) for one period of time equal to a twenty-fourth part of a day and night and divided into 60 period of time equal to sixty sixtieth of a period of time equal to sixty seconds or a sixtieth of a period of time equal to a twenty-fourth part of a day and night and divided into 60 minutes of time, which as the international system of units of measurement unit of time is defined in terms of the natural periodicity of the radiation of a cesium-133 atom (Symbol: ″) or a sixtieth of a period of time equal to a twenty-fourth part of a day and night and divided into 60 minutes of time. Did that answer your question?

Randy: Yes.

Father: I love you, kiddo.

3 comments:

ETC said...

I really hope a lot of people read all the way through that one.

ETC said...

.... so, any news on the "SECOND LONGEST SENTENCE EVER!" status?

TheGrza said...

"The Guinness Book of World Records has an entry for what it claims is the longest sentence in English. It cites a sentence from one of William Faulkner's novels, Absalom, Absalom! containing 1,287 words. Other sources mention a 4,391 word sentence from James Joyce's Ulysses. In 2001 Jonathan Coe surpassed both with a 13,955 word sentence in his novel, The Rotters' Club." -Wikipedia, 2006

This sentence is over 7,200 words long and more entertaining than either James Joyce or William Faulkner. I'm gunning for Coe, that tripe-spewing jolly old schoolboy memoir of inspirational teachers, the literally turned his gigantic sentence into a movie of the week. I truly, madly, deeply defined a pretty fundamental unit of electrical force and nearly lost my mind in the pursuit, which bodes well for me and not for that Dead Poets Society Engrish Isles limed fuck, because I'm announcing, here on The Shitizens, Terrorist Watch List, that I am undertaking a grand assignment to blow Coe, Me, Joyce and Faulker out of the water. I might leave me alone, might make a seperate category for second place finishers who occupy the same physical space as the winner, but the rest of those hacks are falling by the wayside with. Get this. A 100,000 word sentence. That's right, 250 pages of sentence goodness, recursion and idiocy, all wrapped in a recurring metaphor of death.

Get it. A death sentence. A really long death sentence. For you.